Arts and Crafts / Craftsman

The Craftsman bungalow (also known as Arts and Crafts) was a popular house style between 1905 and the 1930s, and it’s making a comeback today. A distinguishing feature of the style is the large amount of interior woodwork, such as built-in shelving and seating.

Bungalow and Craftsman style homes were born out of the Arts and Crafts Movement. The emphasis is on natural materials — wood, stone and brick. Wide front porches and low-pitched roofs are typical. The interior’s open floor plan features built-in furniture, big fireplaces and exposed beams.

Low-pitched gable roof with deep, bracketed overhangs and exposed rafters; porches supported by massive piers and unadorned square posts; windows and doors with long vertical panes.

Followers of the Arts and Crafts movement (started in England in the late 19th century), particularly California architects Greene and Greene, spurned machine-made products and emphasized the beauty of hand-crafted natural materials (the grain of oak, for example) over Victorian-era excesses. A more vernacular version of the style, also known as Bungalow or Craftsman Bungalow, was popularized through the patterns of Gustav Stickley’s Craftsman magazine. The style also grew out of Frank Lloyd Wright’s work in the Prairie style at the turn of the 20th century.

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